Read about making and using the 'future perfect' below. Then, when you are ready, try these practice exercises to practise using the 'future perfect simple' and 'future perfect continuous'.

Using the 'future perfect'

Future perfect simple

Perfect means "before". For example, finished before a time in the future. This example means that you will retire before 2050. We usually use this with 'by' or 'by the time'.

By 2050, I'll have retired.

Perfect can also mean "until". Here, it started before a time in the future, and is not finished. In this example, I got married in 2015, and in 2030 I'll still be married. You should say for how long (so it's common to use it with the preposition for).

By 2030, I'll have been married for 15 years.

Future perfect continuous

In the examples above, we are talking about a finished action or a continuing state, so we use the perfect simple. But, if we are talking about actions which are not finished, we can use the perfect continuous. In the first example below, the verb "be" is a state, in the second, "teach" is an action.

By 2030, I'll have been a teacher for 20 years.

By 2030, I'll have been teaching English for 20 years.

Look at this lesson about state and action verbs if you need more information.


How to make the future perfect simple

We make the future perfect simple with will have + past participle. It is the same for all people (I, you, he ...).

Positive: They'll have finished work by 6pm.

Negative: They won't have finished work by 6pm.

Question: Will they have finished work by 6pm?

 

How to make the future perfect continuous

We make the future perfect continous with will have been + verb-ing. It is the same for all people (I, you, he ...).

Positive: By 6pm she'll have been playing football for 5 hours.

Negative: By 6pm she won't have been playing football for long.

Question: How long will she have been playing football?


 Now try these exercises to practise using the 'future perfect simple' and 'future perfect continuous'.